stump the chump

Stump the Chump: November-December 2016

by Megan Frank on November 10, 2016

by Ted Collins, AKA Doc Lilac

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Hints:

With legumes I’m likely to be compared
“Pinnate,” pods, and all that stuff,
My stems are a little tooth-brush like
But not quite as stiff or rough.

If bigger, like closer relatives,
I’d be good as firewood,
Plus as rot-resistant fence posts,
and I’d take over if I could.

I flower briefly, month of May,
Rose-colored showy, no scent.
The fact that you don’t know me better,
Is, of course, my chief lament.

I’m not sold at Northern Nurseries
or Oriental Garden Supply,
I could be invasive, so they are evasive,
Say John Prince and Al Pfieffer: “That’s why!”

 

The first person to answer correctly, genus and species please, will win a $50 gift certificate to Aladdin’s. Please call 585/301-7181 or email megan@upstategardenersjournal.com to guess.

We will accept guesses starting November 14, 2016, in order to give everyone a fair chance. Good luck!

 

 

The answer to the September-October 2016 stumper: Vigna unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis

 

 

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Stump the Chump: September-October 2016

by Megan Frank on September 12, 2016

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Hints:
Its bean a long time since I’ve seen this one,
Not even at Palmiters, southwest,
Nor at the nearest herbarium,
Where I once was a frequent guest (pre Google).

Its leguminous, deciduous, entomophilous,
procumbent it is not.
It produces much better with some support
a reputation tasty its got.

Mike Viens and Greg Frank know the answer,
So they cannot participate.
Nor can Greg’s pal in Darien
Despite his status as tree potentate.

“Catalpa” said Greg at first viewing
and I laughed at his precipitous guess
Saying “Greg, you’re a super salesman,
But your mind’s a botanical mess.”

—Ted Collins, AKA Doc Lilac

The first person to answer correctly, genus and species please,
will win a $50 gift certificate to Aladdin’s. Please call 585/301-7181
or email megan@upstategardenersjournal.com to guess.

We will accept guesses starting September 19, 2016, in order to
give everyone a fair chance. Good luck!

 * * *

The answer to the July-August 2016 stumper: Syringa reticulata

 

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Stump the Chump: July-August 2016

by Megan Frank on July 8, 2016

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Hints:
I’m in the olive family,
My fragrances divine,
I bloom in June, also July,
As a street tree, I am fine.

Grandma loved my shrubby kin,
With tulips a great bouquet!
Too bad she moved away.

I’m native to the orient,
Like many a tree or shrub.
If you live in Rochester,
You oughta know me, bub.

 

The first person to answer correctly, genus and species please, will win an Upstate Gardeners’ Journal mug. Please call  585/301-7181 or email megan@upstategardenersjournal.com to guess. We will accept guesses starting July 18, 2016, in order to give everyone a fair chance. Good luck!

 

The answer to the March-April 2016 quadruple stumper: 1. Fagus grandifolia, 2. Cornus mas, 3. Forsythia suspensa, 4. Catulpa catulpa.

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This issue’s specimen is a toughie. It is a non-native and rare in cultivation here in the States, despite being reliably hardy. A small tree, it only reaches about 20 feet and is generally multi-stemmed. The flowers are fragrant and all above-ground parts are edible.

 

The first reader to guess correctly will win a 4 foot tall Hamamelis mollis ‘Wisley Supreme’ (witch hazel) from Holmes Hollow Farm on Turk Hill in Victor. Submit answers to jane@janemilliman.com (fastest) or by calling 585-733-8979.

 

Answer from last issue (July-August 2014): Yellowwood, or Cladrastis kentukea syn. lutea.

Q&A1 Q&A3 Q&A2

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Name this plant!

mystery1 mystery2

A native ornamental, it grows to 50 feet tall. It sports handsome foliage and bark, and white flowers in panicles, late May to early June. At Lilac Hill there is a pink-flowered variety, which Ted Collins obtained from Coldwater Pond Nursery (and Ted Hildebrand, no fair guessing). This is an underused gem, great as a lawn specimen.

The first reader to guess correctly will win a lilac from Lilac Hill Nursery. Submit answers to jane@janemilliman.com or by calling 585-733-8979.

We already have a winner, but if you want to guess, leave a comment below.

Answer from last issue (May-June 2014): The Pepperidge tree, also known as black gum (Nyssa sylvatica)

 

 

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Q&A

Stump the Chump

This issue we continue with our “reverse Q&A,” because our readers are having such a good time with it.

The late Professor Donald Wyman, of Harvard’s Arnold Arboretum fame, asserted that this was the tree most often sent in for identification. This tree sports brilliant fall coloration and its fruit is an ovoid drupe about half an inch long.

The first reader to guess correctly will win a lilac from Lilac Hill Nursery. Submit answers to jane@janemilliman.com or by calling 585-733-8979.

 

Nyssa sylvatica pepperidge bud 1 pepperidge bud 2 pepperidge tree silhouette

 

 

Give up?
It’s Nyssa sylvativa, aka black gum, or pepperidge tree.

Answers from previous issues: March-April 2014, Dunstan hybrid chestnut; November-December 2013, Sorbus alnifolia, Korean mountain ash.

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Q&A: We ask, YOU answer

by janem on March 24, 2014

UPDATE:

We’ve had dozens and dozens of guesses, and want to announce that this issue’s mystery plan is the Dunstan chestnut. You can read all about it here.

Congratulation to the first correct guesser, Sue Eick! She wins a lilac from Lilac Hill Nursery.

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Back in November we ran a “reverse Q&A” wherein we asked you, the reader, to Name This Plant. It was such a popular feature that we’ve decided to do it again. It’s a toughie, so if we don’t get any correct guesses by the end of March we’ll post a clue here.

The first reader to guess correctly will win a lilac from Lilac Hill Nursery. Submit answers to jane@janemilliman.com or by calling 585-733-8979.

The pictures are of a seedling, the winter foliage of a mature specimen, and some fruits (nuts).

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